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History Part II – Photo tips

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  • History Part II – Photo tips



    Photo Tips

    Hey there. It's Farrah again with Part II of our History lesson. This part will cover photo tips to make life a little easier with less editing later.


    Tips for great photos

    1. Exposure triangle -
    • ISO is the camera's sensitivity to light. the higher the ISO is the brighter the photo will be, the lower the ISO is the darker the photo will be (assuming other settings don't change). Increasing the ISO can be very useful for taking photos in low-light settings, but a high ISO also produces photos with more noise/graininess.
    • Aperture reflects the size of the lens opening that lets light into the camera. Aperture is expressed in “f-stop” numbers like "f/2.8." The smaller the f-stop, the larger or wider the aperture is. The larger the aperture/lens opening is, the larger the amount of light let in and the brighter the photo will be (assuming other settings don't change). The smaller the aperture/lens opening is, the smaller the amount of light let in. The aperture also determines the amount of the photo that is in focus (depth of field). A very small aperture will keep everything in the frame in focus. But a large aperture opening will make only a small section of the photo in focus.
    • Shutter speed is the setting that determines how long the camera shutter remains open to let light in. The faster the shutter speed, the darker the photo will be, and the slower the shutter speed, the brighter the photo will be (assuming other settings aren't changed). Shutter speed is also important for capturing motion; a slow shutter speed will capture any movement (intentional or not) as blurring, while a fast shutter speed will "freeze" a moment of that motion clearly.
    Exposure is a balancing act and takes a lot of practice. Keep in mind that changing each element not only impacts the exposure of the image but each one also has an impact upon other aspects of it. For example, changing the aperture changes the depth of field; changing the ISO changes the graininess of a photo; and changing shutter speed impacts how much motion is captured.

    2. LIGHT- every photographer knows that light is the biggest key to great photos. Always be aware of where your light is coming from, whether it is natural or artificial light, whether it comes from in front, the side, or even behind the subject. Know your light and use it to your advantage!

    3. De-clutter – The best way to feature your subject is to make sure the background is free from clutter. Watch your angles and watch the details in your background.

    4. Rule of thirds – Often times, we’re tempted to just point and shoot so we don’t miss anything, but that also means that a lot of times our subjects are smack dab in the middle of the frame. If we take a moment to shift our camera so that the subject is around the outer 3rd of the frame, it can draw interest to the photo. Another idea is to crop it later when adding it to a layout. This is especially helpful with fast moving pets, kids, or those moments you can’t afford to miss.

    5. Think outside the box - see things from a new angle or see them in a new way. Sometimes the best moments are spontaneous, so be ready to grab them when you can!



    Making History

    It's great to remember and practice the rules and tips and I recommend even more in-depth photography
    lessons if you want to really improve, however; it can be easy to get caught up in the skills and forget to capture moments as they happen. Don't be afraid to put you camera on Auto. Have fun! Remember that we scrapbook for our selves and our families. While you’re practicing your photo skills, always remember to have a great time and take photos and make the most of them. So what if a shot is out of focus, but it brings a smile to your face. It’s your scrapbook and if you love it, GO WITH IT!


    Homework

    Your homework assignment for this part is to make a layout with a NEW photo. You can practice your skills or just capture a moment in history, but the photo MUST BE NEW. Please post the original photo along with your layout.


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    Last edited by mommyish; 07-01-2015, 08:39 AM.

  • #2
    I lightened the original for the part of the photo in the frame. It's not history, but it is a new photo.


    Last edited by Pamie; 08-05-2015, 01:03 PM.

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    • miimsgirl
      miimsgirl commented
      Editing a comment
      Ohh, Love that pink, and you did a gorgeous framing job there!

  • #3
    I took a new photo of the pumpkin plant that I wasn't sure was going to survive! so far it is still alive! Yay! I tried taking a photo from a more interesting angle (this plant is actually growing in a raised veg bed, so it is at eye level IRL!) and using the rule of thirds, and making sure not to just plonk the flower in the middle of the shot, which meant that I could then put a word on the photo itself (something I can rarely do because I am generally a middle of the photo plonker!). Thanks for the lesson, and here is my photo and my page


    Last edited by corrin; 07-02-2015, 12:22 PM.

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    • miimsgirl
      miimsgirl commented
      Editing a comment
      This is so preyty Corrin! I always love the simplicity of your pages!

  • #4




    I took these photos this past weekend. The light was rapidly changing so the group pictures needed a bit of tweaking. These were taken with my iPhone and the Camera+ app.

    Last edited by Pamie; 07-05-2015, 08:53 AM.

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    • miimsgirl
      miimsgirl commented
      Editing a comment
      How fun is that! They are so into what they are doing!

  • #5
    We've recently gotten into technical mountain biking (my husband and I each tow a kid on a trailer bike while we do this too), and this is something that we enjoy doing a family, so it makes sense to capture those memories. Most of my photos are of the views we see when we stop, but so much of what we actually see is just the trail in front of us as we're riding, so this time I went with "just snap a photo in the moment"....I was bombing down a single-track trail near the end of a 3.5-mile technical mountain bike ride and the wildflowers along the side of the trail were just so pretty....and I wanted to stop but we were all moving fast and I was the first in line and not really in the mood to cause a huge pile-up....so this photo was from the phone in the handlebar mount while we were riding (on a smooth part of the trail). Fun times. I'm not sure if the blurriness along the sides was due to jostling or something smudged on the camera lens....but it looks intentional and arty, and blurry is fine because blurry is real (and it's not so obvious in the final product), so it's all good.



    Comment


    • miimsgirl
      miimsgirl commented
      Editing a comment
      NICE framing! I just love photos with a fun perspective and you really have that here.

  • #6
    I did a two page spread cuz I always take a lot of pix at the moon rise. The golden light changes subtly and I didn't edit any of these shots. No cropping either, used the zoom feature on my camera for the moon close up. I did use the photo filters editing tool to make Leah's silver wire alphas look like the sunset glow!



    http://forums.thedigitalpress.co/gal...diting&cat=519
    Last edited by Pamie; 08-05-2015, 01:06 PM.

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    • #7
      Here is mine



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